Julio César Morales & Max La Rivière-Hedrick

Julio César Morales & Max La Rivière-Hedrick - CurrentLA Food Julio César Morales & Max La Rivière-Hedrick - CurrentLA Food Julio César Morales & Max La Rivière-Hedrick - CurrentLA Food Julio César Morales & Max La Rivière-Hedrick - CurrentLA Food Julio César Morales & Max La Rivière-Hedrick - CurrentLA Food Julio César Morales & Max La Rivière-Hedrick - CurrentLA Food Julio César Morales & Max La Rivière-Hedrick - CurrentLA Food Julio César Morales & Max La Rivière-Hedrick - CurrentLA Food

New Shores: The Future Dialogue Between Two Homelands

Barnsdall Park, East Hollywood, Council District 13

About the Artist

Max La Rivière-Hedrick and Julio César Morales have been collaborating since 2006 on food-based performance and video projects that have taken shape as forms of inquiry to address alternative forms of history through culinary explorations. Their collaborative work experiments with multimodal practice, which aims to create a mood or thought in a person using a combination of senses. Their collaborative projects have been shown at the 2008 California Biennale at the Orange County Museum of Art (Newport Beach, California), LAXART (Los Angeles), and Museo Tamayo (Mexico City), among others.

About the Artwork

Inspired by Carlos Fuentes’s book The Orange Tree, which describes how oranges have traveled around the globe, Julio César Morales and Max La Rivière-Hedrick consider the relationship between food and the immigrant experience through a speculative exploration of home, personal history, and migration. New Shores: The Future Dialogue Between Two Homelands focuses on the duality of immigrant experiences through sound, music, poetry, food tastings, tapestry, film, installation, and performance. Morales and La Rivière-Hedrick thoughtfully incorporate the ethnic diversity in East Hollywood and the Barnsdall Park site—Korean, Armenian, Thai, and Mexican, among others. The artists collaborate with a local chef or restauranteur to share their personal account of how food reminds them of home; Morales and La Riviére-Hedrick reinterpret their respective memories within the context of an imagined Los Angeles in the year 2029. These personal accounts are the foundation for a series of five interactive public performances inspired by night markets and featuring a multisensory installation that integrates orange (the color and the fruit) as a visual and conceptual thread.